Responsible sourcing

RESPONSIBLE SOURCING

G4-DMA

Purpose

Arhuaca Community, Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta, Colombia.

Arhuaca Community, Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta, Colombia.

 

To ensure business continuity, capitalizing on opportunities and managing the effects, risks and impacts generated outside the Company’s direct area of control, by incorporating social and environmental variables in the management of the supply chain.

Strategy and Progress 2015

Strategy Progress 2015
Improve and expand coverage of the strategic sourcing model. ico_f_verde

Regional negotiations were conducted in Costa Rica, Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Peru, Chile and Colombia for a total of 300 initiatives.

ico_f_verde

A total of 201 categories were addressed through the methodology of strategic sourcing, achieving savings of COP 6,500 million in Chile, COP 3,000 million in Central America and COP 44,100 million in Colombia, leveraged by the Purchasing Office in China by 8.7%.

Close gaps in sustainable sourcing. ico_f_verdeOscuro

Through external consulting, social and environmental risks are identified in the supply chain for Pozuelo and Chocolates Costa Rica.

ico_f_verdeOscuro

Training and knowledge transfer was conducted in the negotiation and supplier management teams in six countries.

ico_f_verdeOscuro

An agreement was signed with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) to administer and treat sustainability risks of the principal raw materials.

Incorporate ethical and third party audits on suppliers. ico_f_verdeA

Eight work, and six third party audits on suppliers were conducted, which included work, environmental and social components.

Develop organizational capabilities for farmers. ico_f_amarillo

3.000 farmers from 34 organizations in five departments in Colombia were trained through a model to strengthen organizational development and information and communication technologies.

Manage public–private partnerships for the social and business strengthening of suppliers. ico_f_naranja

13 public–private alliances were defined with local entities in five municipalities in Colombia.

Risks and Opportunities

Grupo Nutresa continues to manage the risks identified for all its purchasing categories, such as breaches in practices in quality, safety and sustainability; the high volatility in the prices of direct supplies; the shortage of supplies generated by climate change; and the migration of farmers to the cities.

To manage them, we have introduced sustainability criteria during the selection and hiring stages for suppliers of goods and services, and we have published and implemented the Supplier Code of Conduct, which is aligned with the 10 Principles of the United Nations Global Compact.

The Company also has policies and manuals that provide a framework of action and direction for its own operations and those of third parties, such as policies on Supplier Selection, Hedging, Human Rights, Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) and a Manual for Contractors, among others.

Risks associated with product safety are managed and evaluated by the Purchasing, Quality and Research and Development areas, to ensure compliance with the specifications required for supplies and those of the integrated management systems.

Finally, through Fundación Nutresa we manage strategies to mitigate the migration of young people to cities through actions to develop capabilities and generational change in supply chains, which strengthen them as rural entrepreneurs with better economic opportunities and quality of life.

Future Perspectives

Grupo Nutresa has been conducting exercises in foresight for sourcing processes, mapping the challenges and identifying trends, to manage future risks to 2030 in a timely manner. In the medium and long term, sourcing processes will be intensive in the use of multi–dimensional information and traceability throughout the supply chain, as well as technologies that support businesses processes.

Achieving efficient non–contact relationships with business partners is a challenge for Grupo Nutresa, which is managed by implementing connectivity services that permit having a closer relationship with suppliers and making processes more efficient throughout the entire chain.

Another challenge is to reduce the environmental and social risks around the principal raw materials used by the businesses. Therefore, together with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), we are identifying actions in the different purchasing categories and structuring and implementing strategies, mechanisms and measurement systems under a vision of sustainable sourcing.

Moreover, through Fundación Nutresa we continue to power the organizational and community capacities of farmers and we project that we will positively impact 73 associations of small producers by 2020. Likewise, we seek to strengthen the inclusive business model with a methodology of our own development, to give added value to the social and commercial management of the business, through which actions to eradicate poverty, mitigate identified risks and increase the socio–economic status of communities with benefits for the Company and its stakeholders are increased.

Remarkable Achievements

Start of construction of the Cherry Coffee Benefit Center in the municipality of Ciudad Bolivar, Colombia.

Start of construction of the Cherry Coffee Benefit Center in the municipality of Ciudad Bolivar, Colombia.

 

The construction of a micro–processing plant for coffee cherries in Ciudad Bolívar, in the Department of Antioquia, is another success story, after a contribution of COP 1,026 million by Industria Colombiana de Café (Colcafé). This project is expected to achieve a savings of 25 million liters of water per year, the proper disposal of the water used in the process to the watersheds in the area, and composting coffee pulp for its subsequent use as an organic fertilizer by coffee growers.

Winners of 2014 Exemplary Supplier Grupo Nutresa. From left to right: Sol Beatriz Arango M., Vicepresident of Sustainable Development Grupo Nutresa; Miguel Krausz H., Manager at Grasco Ltda., Martha Tobar O., Director of the International Division of Industrial Grasco; Germán Zapata H., Negotiation Manager of Compras Servicios Nutresa; Carlos Ignacio Gallego P., President of Grupo Nutresa; Marcela Gutierrez T., Sales Manager MANE Colombia; Alejandro Henao P., General Manager of MANE Colombia.

Winners of 2014 Exemplary Supplier Grupo Nutresa. From left to right: Sol Beatriz Arango M., Vicepresident of Sustainable Development Grupo Nutresa; Miguel Krausz H., Manager at Grasco Ltda., Martha Tobar O., Director of the International Division of Industrial Grasco; Germán Zapata H., Negotiation Manager of Compras Servicios Nutresa; Carlos Ignacio Gallego P., President of Grupo Nutresa; Marcela Gutierrez T., Sales Manager MANE Colombia; Alejandro Henao P., General Manager of MANE Colombia.

 

gcv_logoProveedorEjemplar

As a success story, noteworthy is the first Exemplary Supplier event, which recognized those suppliers from the different goods and service categories, large companies and SMEs, who stand out for their contribution to achieve Grupo Nutresa’s objectives by implementing sustainability and innovation practices, and for their effort to be better each day in changing environments. A total of 17 suppliers from more than 1,000 suppliers invited to the program were recognized.

 

The complete list of winners is available at http://www.serviciosnutresa.com/comunicado-proveedor-ejemplar/
Receiving the 2015 Emprender paz Award.

Receiving the 2015 Emprender paz Award.

 

Grupo Nutresa was recognized with the Emprender Paz 2015 award, for its social and productive organic cocoa initiative with the Arhuaco communities in the Fundación River Basin, in the Department of Magdalena. Since its inception in 2014, this idea – supported by Compañía Nacional de Chocolates and Fundación Nutresa – has positively impacted 139 families associated with the Kankawarwa cocoa associative project. The communities have participated in a process to transfer knowledge and organizational strengthening, through the action scheme of strategic allies, to ensure continuity of the agribusiness of the Indigenous communities.

Progress 2015

Cocoa farmer from San Vicente de Chucurí. Colombia.

Cocoa farmer from San Vicente de Chucurí. Colombia.

RESPONSIBLE SOURCING

For Grupo Nutresa, the management and development of its suppliers are part of its strategic priorities; for this reason, it has defined and identified the risks in sustainability, currently managed through programs to promote sustainable practices, the application of policies and the development of capabilities in different internal and external instances of the Organization.

In this sense, local suppliers that comply with the Code of Conduct, the quality and price requirements, and the sourcing conditions established by the different companies are privileged.

GRUPO NUTRESA RESPONSIBLE SOURCING MODEL

ALIGNMENT, QUALIFICATION AND COMPLIANCE OF STANDARDS

In addition to their qualification to ensure high quality products and services that are in accordance with market requirements, alignment with business partners regarding policies, standards and requirements is part of the responsible sourcing model.

Annually, supplier audits are conducted that include the different quality, environmental, occupational safety and health, commercial security, safety and sustainability management systems, which seek to identify aspects for improvement in the management of production processes, ensure labor and human rights practices, and develop skills through training spaces. Support and advice on management and compliance of requirements associated with the plants and their products are provided; this accompaniment ensures not only legal obligations but also standards for product quality and safety.

Increase in Competencies

During 2015, 750 suppliers of raw materials, packaging materials and service providers were trained on issues such as sustainable development, occupational safety and health, legal updating, contractor manuals, management systems, money laundering and the financing of terrorism, human management, supplier portals and the self development. A total of 9,510 hours were invested and 4,607 people participated, which generated a positive impact on the Company’s social capital by creating skills in suppliers.

Altogether, 267 suppliers in the categories of direct and indirect materials were assessed within the supplier evaluation and monitoring programs, which has generated more than 1,076 improvement actions that have contributed to closing gaps and increasing skills in environmental, logistics, quality and safety aspects in suppliers and their production processes.

Number and percentage of suppliers evaluated

  • Raw materials 120 - 45%
  • Services 113 - 42%
  • Packaging 34 - 13%
The Competitive Value Networks Project

This multi–sector initiative is designed for companies to optimize their operations under a common language and through the use of collaborative tools and platforms. Together with the companies Logyca and GS1 in Colombia, Grupo Nutresa participates in this program and has made an impact on 27 suppliers in the promotion and implementation of international marking standards that ensure the traceability and efficiencies throughout the chain. The Grupo Nutresa companies that actively participate in the program are Servicios Nutresa, Compañía Nacional de Chocolates, Pastas Doria, Meals de Colombia, Colcafé, Compañía de Galletas Noel, Alimentos Cárnicos and Zenú.

Verifying mechanisms of compliance of supply policy G4-FP1

  • Self-Assessment 47.10%
  • Audit 44.90%
  • Code of conduct 39.90%
  • Contractual clauses 6.21%
  • Third party verification 0.26%

Percentage of Volume Purchased from Suppliers Who Comply with the Company’s Purchasing Policy.

Innovation Managers

In association with Ruta N, the Center for Innovation and Business in Medellín, suppliers of goods and services were invited to participate in the summons for innovation managers, in the framework of the signing of the Great Pact for Innovation, aimed at developing competencies in companies to implement an innovation management system to enable them to increase long–term competitiveness and strengthen their intellectual capital.

 

The Value Network Encounter

During 2015 Compañía de Galletas Noel summoned more than 39 suppliers to the XXIV Annual Value Network Encounter, where clients, suppliers, unions and other groups related to the value chain of the business shared the challenges and trends in sourcing, the economic and political context, and best practices in sustainability and leadership.

 

Improved Processes

The external assembly and/or alternative forms of product negotiation with third parties was updated and improved, to ensure and standardize compliance with quality, commercial and socio–environmental requirements by suppliers and to manage the risks present in the chain associated with this mode of supply.

Yariguíes Farm, located in the municipalities of Barrancabermeja and San Vicente de Chuchrí, Santander. Colombia.

Yariguíes Farm, located in the municipalities of Barrancabermeja and San Vicente de Chuchrí, Santander. Colombia.

Connectivity with Suppliers

Seven new connectivity services were activated and improvements were made in five services on the supplier portal www.gruponutresaenlinea.com. The improvements are related to updating data; online communication of purchase orders; inventories; self–management in communications to access the portal; request for and assignment of transport service for finished products with companies providing this service, and eLearning modules, among others. All of the above are aimed at improving the collaborative management of operations and their efficiency, interaction with suppliers of goods and services in favor of transparency, business continuity and compliance of the requirements associated with sustainability, money laundering and the financing of terrorism.

Meanwhile, the Biscuit Business began eBilling processes with transport suppliers; for 2016, this process will be extended to raw material and packaging material suppliers, to improve the logistics operation and reduce the environmental impacts.

REDUCTION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL IMPACT IN THE SUPPLY CHAIN

Another part of Grupo Nutresa’s responsible sourcing model is to ensure the decrease of environmental and social impacts in the different categories of purchases of goods and services.

Grupo Nutresa examines its suppliers based on the social, environmental and economic risks for each of the categories of goods and services, to focus on and develop activities that positively impact its supply chain. The analysis was performed applying the methodology of Grupo Nutresa’s holistic risk management process.

In 2015 risks were identified to which the categories of purchases of materials and services for the businesses in Costa Rica were exposed, which extends and complements the exercise conducted in Colombia in 2014.

Percentage of New Suppliers that Were Examined in Terms of Sustainability Criteria. G4-EN32 G4-LA14 SDG 5 SDG 8 SDG 16 G4-SO9 G4-HR10

Gestionar cadena de valor_04
Based on:
Criteria Environmental
23.8%
Criteria Labor Practices
6.1%
Criteria Human Rights
6.1%
Criteria for impacts on society
18.9%
Based on:
Criteria Environmental
Criteria Labor Practices
Criteria Human Rights
Criteria for impacts on society
Percentage of new suppliers that were examined
23.8%
6.1%
6.1%
18.9%

Criteria Evaluated:
Environmental: Impact on flora and fauna, use of hazardous substances, increased waste generation, increased consumption of natural resources, climate variability, negative reaction of stakeholders regarding the use of GMOs, increased air emissions, animal abuse.Labor Practices: Unfair wages, non–conducive work environment. Human Rights: Child labor, violation of the right to freedom of association and collective bargaining. Impacts on Society: Impacts on the health of the final consumer, impact on neighboring communities.

New Suppliers with Significant, Real and Potencial Negative Impacts in the Supply Chain and Measures regarding the Matter. G4-EN33 G4-LA15 SDG 5 SDG 8 SDG 16 G4-SO10 G4-HR11

Gestionar cadena de valor_05
In function of criteria:
Environmental
341
85
72 - 85%
3 - 1%
Labor Practices
98
7
6 - 86%
0 - 0%
Human Rights
131
2
1 - 50%
0 - 0%
Impacts on Society
116
15
15 - 100%
0 - 0%
In function of criteria:
Environmental
Labor Practices
Human Rights
Impacts on Society
Number of suppliers whose impact has been evaluated
341
98
131
116
Number of suppliers with significant real negative impacts
85
7
2
15
Suppliers identified as having significant actual and potential negative impacts with which improvements were agreed upon as a result of assessment
72
85%
6
86%
1
50%
15
100%
Suppliers identified as having significant actual and potential negative impacts with which relationships were terminated as a result of assessment
3
1%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%

Criteria Evaluated:
Environmental: Impact on flora and fauna, use of hazardous substances, increased waste generation, increased consumption of natural resources, climate variability, negative reaction of stakeholders as to the use of GMOs, increased air emissions, animal abuse. Labor Practices: Application of legal rules for hiring staff, non–conducive work environment. Human Rights: Violation of the right to freedom of association and collective bargaining. Impacts on Society: Impacts on the health of the final consumer.

In addition to regular audits conducted on site with suppliers, and in which sustainability variables have been included, during 2015 eight labor audits and six ethical third party audits on suppliers were conducted under Intertek’s Workplace Conditions Assessment (WCA). Its goal is to have broader knowledge on the compliance of sustainability criteria for suppliers and the categories classified as high environmental or social risk.

Impacts related to transport, packaging reduction and optimizing are developed in the Chapters “Responsible Sales” and “Post–Consumption Packaging.”

SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT

Grupo Nutresa seeks to manage and develop agricultural chains to ensure the growth of suppliers and communities in the area of influence of the productive areas, while managing the risks associated with sustainability.

Yariguíes Farm, located in the municipalities of Barrancabermeja and San Vicente de Chucurí, Santander. Colombia.

Yariguíes Farm, located in the municipalities of Barrancabermeja and San Vicente de Chucurí, Santander. Colombia.

 

Promoting Coffee

With the commercialization of products certified under the Fairtrade label, Colcafé continues to generate benefits to coffee growing communities that produce green coffee certified under this label, which gives consumers certainty about the ethical values of the product and supports the sustainable development of the producer organizations.

Through alliances and negotiations with international clients, from the inception of the program the Business has transferred resources in excess of COP 33,000 million to communities. The social premium transferred is mainly used in initiatives aimed at productivity and crop quality, environmental projects, social services and education and other projects covered by this certification.

In the last five years, not only has the value of the premiums transferred increased, but also the number of coffee growers benefitted, located in eight departments in Colombia.

 

Fairtrade Coffee

Gestionar cadena de valor_06
2011
20
2,194
2012
20
3,808
2013
22
4,469
2014
34
5,656
2015
34
7,338
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
Communities Benefitted
20
20
22
34
34
Bonuses Paid plus Premiums (COP millions)
2,194
3,808
4,469
5,656
7,338
President of the World Bank visiting the production alliance between Compañia Nacional de Chocolates with cocoa farmers from Perijá.

President of the World Bank visiting the production alliance between Compañia Nacional de Chocolates with cocoa farmers from Perijá.

 

Promoting Cocoa

The Chocolate Business works for the sustainability of the cocoa supply chain, investing more than COP 4,050 million in promoting cocoa culture in Colombia, strengthening the capacities of farmers, researching and working with local authorities, banks, research centers, universities and government institutions, to benefit cocoa producers.

Purchases made from more than 1,350 suppliers, including farmers, associations, corporations, cooperatives and individuals, corresponded to a total of 22,599 tons of cocoa in 2015 for COP 162,600 million.

Compañía Nacional de Chocolates continues to promote special certifications in markets and online, and purchased 105 tons of cocoa with the Fairtrade certification, which generated quality bonuses of COP 52 million for cocoa farmers, thus contributing to the growth of their financial capital. Additionally, it purchased 73.4 tons of organic cocoa, paying a premium of COP 52.6 million and acquired 79.4 tons of origin cocoa, paying a special premium of COP 42.2 million.

The Principal Projects during 2015 were:

  • Inclusive Businesses: The Chocolate Business supported cocoa grower projects totaling 21,294 hectares and benefitted nearly 12,206 families in 22 departments and 119 municipalities in Colombia.
  • Innovation and Development: In the Innovation, Research and Technological Transfer Plan, 126 training sessions and technical visits were conducted with the assistance of 2,192 technicians and farmers.
  • Mass Cocoa Grower Disclosures: Since 2012, Compañía Nacional de Chocolates has developed a communication strategy, based on text messages, which seeks to educate farmers in friendly practices in cocoa farming. To date, 4,349 farmers have benefitted.
  • Cocoa for the Future: This is a new business model that promotes the cultivation of cocoa ensuring its production and future availability, with a positive socio–economic impact on growers. In 2015, there were 991 hectares with 55 farmers in nine municipalities. Investment reached COP 4,754 million, totaling COP 26,570 million.
  • Experimental Farm: The Yariguíes Farm, located in the municipalities of Barrancabermeja San Vicente de Chucurí, in Colombia, generated 80 direct jobs; it received 444 visitors for training, produced 1,113,394 pattern cocoa seedlings for its projects and those of third parties, grafts, seeds and 13,190 timber species, and received the renewal of its Certification in Best Agricultural Practices (BAPs) from ICONTEC, a Forestry Compensation (carbon sequestration) program, the Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario (ICA) Clonal Orchard program, recognition as a producer and distributor of cocoa vegetative propagation material, and registration as an ICA Breeding Research Unit.
  • Cocoa and Cashew Grower Encounters: With the support of Compañía Nacional de Chocolates and Fundación Nutresa, it was possible to conduct training in leadership, networking and teamwork for more than 150 farmers in 18 producing associations in five departments in Colombia. The I Encounter of Cocoa Growers from the northern coast of Colombia, which brought together more than 55 farmers who – in addition to talking about leadership, networking and marketing of cocoa – met other farmers and learned their ways to maintain crops. Likewise, the IV Northern Chocó Cocoa Grower Encounter was held, managed by the Montebravo second–level association. Finally, the cashew producers’ community of Chinú held the I Encounter of Cashew Growers in this region, where 120 families came together in the Pisabonito hamlet and strengthened the sense of ownership for their crops.
Animal Welfare

Grupo Nutresa’s swine production systems are designed to ensure animal welfare and comfort. Therefore, of the 86 farms that supply the Cold Cut Business, 90.5% are certified in best livestock and safety practices. Also, to give continuity to the implementation of best environmental practices, a shop was conditioned and two collection centers for solid waste were built to impact the environmental management on farms with an investment of COP 28.8 million. Grupo Nutresa did not receive any sanctions or fines for noncompliance of laws related to animal transport, management and processing practices. G4-FP13

Porcinorte Farm, Angostura. Colombia.

Porcinorte Farm, Angostura. Colombia.

Animals raised and processed G4-FP9 SDG 2 SDG 15

Gestionar cadena de valor_07
Animal/Breed*
2013
148,329
2014
155,063
2015
161,371
Animal/Breed*
2013
2014
2015
Pigs / Landrace, Large White, Duroc, F1, F2, Muscular, PIC, Commercial
148,329
155,063
161,371

*100% pigs, regardless of their breed, receive the same treatment on the farms.

Policies and Practices Related to Physical Alterations and the Use of Anesthesia G4-FP10

  • Notches in the ear of piglets at birth as part of their individual identification in the core level of the population (that is, 6% of the total births).
  • Tail cutting in 100% of the piglets at birth with tail cutter, cauterization and disinfection.
  • Ear piercing in 100% of the population to place the swine–pest tag (chapeta) in their third week of life.
  • Numeric identification on the skin of 100% of animals with a tattoo hammer.
  • Use of anesthesia and analgesia in surgeries for hernias or fights between animals.

 

Animals raised and or processed per housingtype G4-FP11
Some 95.7% is pens and 4.3% is cages. Pens are differentiated and have homogenized populations by age and size to match development conditions, protect the health of the pigs and reduce stress.

 

Policies and Practices Related to Treatments with Antibiotics, Anti–Inflammatories, Hormones and Growth Promotion. G4-FP12 SDG 2

  • Antibiotics: Penicillin, Tetracycline, Sulfa, Enrofloxacin, Amoxicillin, Streptomycin, Florfenicol, Tolutromicine.
  • Anti–Inflammatories: Ketoprofen, Meloxicam.
  • Hormones: Oxytocin, Prostaglandin; chorionic Gonadotropin
  • Growth Promoters: Ractopamin.

 

Training for wheat suppliers in Chile with the support of the Agricultural Research Institute (INIA).

Training for wheat suppliers in Chile with the support of the Agricultural Research Institute (INIA).

 

Wheat

During 2015 five knowledge transfer sessions were held with Durum Wheat suppliers and brokers in Chile, with the support of the Agricultural Research Institute (Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias, INIA), in which some 180 suppliers participated. In these sessions topics, such as cereal plant pathology, disease prevention, crop safety, application of fungicides, commitments to sustainability, improving wheat and strategic challenges, among others, were discussed. Also, direct accompaniments with wheat suppliers were carried out in crop areas.

Management of Inclusive Businesses, Income Generation and Entrepreneurship

The production of healthy, high quality food is not only consolidated in the production plants of the businesses; it originates from the purchase of agricultural goods that, in addition to meeting appropriate standards of quality required by the Company, are grown by farmers who are part of processes of transformation and development of organizational, personal and family skills.

Grupo Nutresa participates in sustainable productive projects that contribute to the social development of communities, promote dignified standards of living and develop socio–entrepreneurial skills in farmer associations, building social and financial capital for them. Empowering and qualifying farmers has strengthened the social fabric of communities, increased income and generated more opportunities for growth and sustainability in the field.

During 2015, 3,000 farmers participated in training processes in democratic and participatory management; financial management; managerial, administrative and management capacity; human rights; and healthy habits.

Due to the severe drought, the production of cocoa Choco decreased compared to 2014.

Due to the severe drought, the production of cocoa Choco decreased compared to 2014.

 

Fruits

Noteworthy is the work by Ascompartir and Asofrupa, associations that gather 41 blackberry producing families in the Department of Quindío, where they were strengthened technically and organizationally, overcoming adverse weather conditions.

PRODUCTIVITY AND COMPETITIVENESS IN THE VALUE CHAIN

The strategic sourcing initiative focuses on the negotiation process through the redesign or new sources of supply to enhance the competitiveness of all the categories of materials and services. In 2015, the project was emphatically addressed in Chile and Central America, where cost reductions were achieved through 78 savings initiatives and benefits in profitability of COP 9,600 million.

 

Purchases 2015

Annually, Grupo Nutresa purchases COP 3.99 trillion in goods, with a participation primarily represented by commodities and raw materials.

 

Annualized Purchase by business (COP Billions)

This includes Tresmontes Lucchetti direct raw material purchases. Expenditure values corresponding to companies in SAP

This includes Tresmontes Lucchetti direct raw material purchases. Expenditure values corresponding to companies in SAP

 

Grupo Nutresa Local Purchases 2015 G4-EC9

 

Includes: Commodities, Raw Materials, Packaging Materials, Maintenance, Repair and Operations (MRO), and Services (estimated values) Note: Local suppliers are those located within each country where there are significant operations (processing operations).

Includes: Commodities, Raw Materials, Packaging Materials, Maintenance, Repair and Operations (MRO), and Services (estimated values) Note: Local suppliers are those located within each country where there are significant operations (processing operations).

 

Purchases According to Internationally Recognized Responsible
Production Standards G4-FP2 SDG 2 SDG 12 SDG 14 SDG 15

Purchases certified under international standards help reduce the impact on sustainability in the supply chain thanks to the detailed requirements of these rules, aimed at specific products and places where they are produced.

gcv_ar_progress_Purchases-According

Support and Attention to Supplier

During 2015, we dealt with 39,747 cases from suppliers through the Customer Service Center, of which 6,897 were associated with support in logistics, financial and quality services in the Online Business Portal, facilitating the operation and efficiency in activities in supplier sourcing and those of the Grupo Nutresa companies.

 

Project for strengthening the social and small blackberry farmers.

Project for strengthening the social and small blackberry farmers.

Comparison of Cases on the Online Business Portal 2013 – 2015